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Atlanta, GA
USA

Exotic handbags

Atriarch Editorial 2.jpg

Press

Between 2006 and 2011 the U.S. Census Bureau reported that there was a 25% increase in the number of female hunters. I was a part of that 25% statistic and this is my story. My love for hunting began at an early age, when my Daisy BB gun was a more reliable source of entertainment than anything - other than fashion and my love for animals. Friends would often find me and my Daisy outdoors, dressed of course in my finest feminine attire, targeting a row of aluminum cans set up on tree stumps. After all the cans were "killed" I would up the challenge by stepping back a few feet and repeating the process. 

Fast forward to 2011. I had survived a failed marriage and was a single mother of a 3 year old little boy. During that time I would ask myself, "How would I protect him? Provide for him? How could I teach Champ to become all he could be? What could I do to restore the confidence I needed for those 'what if' moments in life that would present themselves, and how could I create a lifetime bond with my son?" So I began to hunt to resolve these questions. 

 

Years later, I combined my love of the outdoors, hunting and animals with my love of fashion! It is sometimes difficult to explain to friends what appears to be a vast discrepancy between my passion for hunting and a passion for saving animals. I tell them - "Since the beginning of human civilization, hunting has provided a sustainable resource. The animals I hunt are free. They are not subjected to for-profit conditions, chemical enhancements or mass slaughter. Also, from the beginning of time, hunting has contributed largely to wildlife management." As a conservationist, it is important to remind others that the by-products of hunting can be utilize in many pragmatic ways. 

In 2013, I was fortunate to hunt in South Africa and provide local starving villagers (many of them orphaned children) with a protein rich meal that would nourish them for days. Prior to this trip, becoming a high end handbag designer was not on my list of things to do, but that would soon change. Like most hunters, I would simply use my animals for meat and trophy. However, I began noticing my own wastefulness. The very backskins of the animals that I had just prayed "the hunter's prayer" over were being tossed in the trash pile. So I decided to rescue them. 

After returning to the States, I thought about what I could do with the beautiful backskins I had salvaged. I was definitely good at fashion. I was well traveled and knew the latest styles. So I began creating handbag patterns from cardboard and paper and my company, “Atriarch” 

Shortly after, I noticed on social media that there were many snakes, venomous and non-venomous being killed“because they were snakes.” As an lover of all animals, I was disturbed by this. I sent out requests to pick up the dead snakes and used those opportunities to educate people on the difference between types and species. My first time skinning a rattlesnake was a long process; taking a moment to gag, get myself together and cut again. Today, that process now takes me no longer than 5 minutes. 

To continue the mission of my new company, I continually put out messages requesting deer hides from local hunters and deer processors. Even local trappers began to contact me to see if I were interested in taking nuisance animals for meat and hides. 

Once the tanned skins were attained, I began combining fur with various skin colors and patterns into my very own custom creations. The bags told a story. My story. The animal’s story. I could tell you the exact origin of each bag. Soon, other hunters began to understand that what was once considered useless can become a wearable resource.I was also getting positive recognition and praise from anti-hunting activists for utilizing the animal to its fullest potential and not simply killing an animal for sport. 

Atriarch has been operating for 2 years and the journey has involved learning and following the rules of CITIES, finding the best in manufacturing, tanning and gaining invaluable relationships with the hunters and safaris that are respected so much in this industry. 

It is my goal twofold: provide a different and positive perception of hunting for those who are opposed to it, and for my fellow hunters, my hope is to give new options for preserving your treasured moments and stories with your very own Atriarch handbag or accessory.

universal hunter magazine jan 2017

Atriarch Editorial 2.jpg
 
 

Between 2006 and 2011 the U.S. Census Bureau reported that there was a 25% increase in the number of female hunters. I was a part of that 25% statistic and this is my story. My love for hunting began at an early age, when my Daisy BB gun was a more reliable source of entertainment than anything - other than fashion and my love for animals. Friends would often find me and my Daisy outdoors, dressed of course in my finest feminine attire, targeting a row of aluminum cans set up on tree stumps. After all the cans were "killed" I would up the challenge by stepping back a few feet and repeating the process. 

Fast forward to 2011. I had survived a failed marriage and was a single mother of a 3 year old little boy. During that time I would ask myself, "How would I protect him? Provide for him? How could I teach Champ to become all he could be? What could I do to restore the confidence I needed for those 'what if' moments in life that would present themselves, and how could I create a lifetime bond with my son?" So I began to hunt to resolve these questions. 

 

Years later, I combined my love of the outdoors, hunting and animals with my love of fashion! It is sometimes difficult to explain to friends what appears to be a vast discrepancy between my passion for hunting and a passion for saving animals. I tell them - "Since the beginning of human civilization, hunting has provided a sustainable resource. The animals I hunt are free. They are not subjected to for-profit conditions, chemical enhancements or mass slaughter. Also, from the beginning of time, hunting has contributed largely to wildlife management." As a conservationist, it is important to remind others that the by-products of hunting can be utilize in many pragmatic ways. 

In 2013, I was fortunate to hunt in South Africa and provide local starving villagers (many of them orphaned children) with a protein rich meal that would nourish them for days. Prior to this trip, becoming a high end handbag designer was not on my list of things to do, but that would soon change. Like most hunters, I would simply use my animals for meat and trophy. However, I began noticing my own wastefulness. The very backskins of the animals that I had just prayed "the hunter's prayer" over were being tossed in the trash pile. So I decided to rescue them. 

After returning to the States, I thought about what I could do with the beautiful backskins I had salvaged. I was definitely good at fashion. I was well traveled and knew the latest styles. So I began creating handbag patterns from cardboard and paper and my company, “Atriarch” 

Shortly after, I noticed on social media that there were many snakes, venomous and non-venomous being killed“because they were snakes.” As an lover of all animals, I was disturbed by this. I sent out requests to pick up the dead snakes and used those opportunities to educate people on the difference between types and species. My first time skinning a rattlesnake was a long process; taking a moment to gag, get myself together and cut again. Today, that process now takes me no longer than 5 minutes. 

To continue the mission of my new company, I continually put out messages requesting deer hides from local hunters and deer processors. Even local trappers began to contact me to see if I were interested in taking nuisance animals for meat and hides. 

Once the tanned skins were attained, I began combining fur with various skin colors and patterns into my very own custom creations. The bags told a story. My story. The animal’s story. I could tell you the exact origin of each bag. Soon, other hunters began to understand that what was once considered useless can become a wearable resource.I was also getting positive recognition and praise from anti-hunting activists for utilizing the animal to its fullest potential and not simply killing an animal for sport. 

Atriarch has been operating for 2 years and the journey has involved learning and following the rules of CITIES, finding the best in manufacturing, tanning and gaining invaluable relationships with the hunters and safaris that are respected so much in this industry. 

It is my goal twofold: provide a different and positive perception of hunting for those who are opposed to it, and for my fellow hunters, my hope is to give new options for preserving your treasured moments and stories with your very own Atriarch handbag or accessory.